Film4 Productions

Six Film4 titles score a record 15 Oscar nominations, including Best Picture and Director for Room

14 Jan, 2016 Productions Posted in: Academy Awards, Awards

Six Film4-backed films received a record 15 Oscar nominations for the 88th annual awards ceremony, which will air live on 28th February 2016, including Best Picture and Best Director nominations for Room.

“We are deeply grateful that the Academy and its members have embraced our films Carol, Room, Ex Machina, 45 Years, Youth and Amy and recognised the extraordinary talent and creativity in bringing them to audiences far and wide. 15 nominations across the films is an amazing validation of our belief in the potential of these bold, inspirational stories we championed at Film4. It’s enormously rewarding to see everyone’s hard work and creativity illuminated by an Oscar nomination and I am delighted to see so many of our friends and partners honoured today. Congratulations to you all – it’s very well deserved,” said David Kosse, Director of Film4.

carol-1024_LRG (1)

Amongst the films backed by Film4, Todd Haynes’ CAROL received 6 nominations including Best Actress for Cate Blanchett, Best Supporting Actress for Rooney Mara, Best Costume Design, Best Original Score, Best Cinematography and Best Adapted Screenplay.

room itny

Lenny Abrahamson’s Room received 4 nominations including Best Motion Picture, Best Director, Best Actress for Brie Larson and Best Adapted Screenplay for Emma Donoghue.

Ex-Machina-Download-Wallpapers

Alex Garland’s Ex Machina received 2 nominations for Best Original Screenplay and Achievement in Visual Effects.

AMY was nominated for Best Documentary Feature and Charlotte Rampling was nominated for Best Actress for her role in 45 YEARS. Paolo Sorrentino’s YOUTH received a nomination for Best Original Song.

 

 

Film4-backed films Oscar® nominations in full:

 

CAROL

Actress in a Leading Role: Cate Blanchett
Actress in a Supporting Role: Rooney Mara
Adapted Screenplay: Phyllis Nagy
Achievement in Cinematography: Ed Lachman
Achievement in Music Written for Motion Pictures (Original score): Carter Burwell
Achievement in Costume Design: Sandy Powell

 

ROOM

Best Motion Picture of the Year: Ed Guiney
Achievement in Directing: Lenny Abrahamson
Actress in a Leading Role: Brie Larson
Adapted Screenplay: Emma Donoghue

EX MACHINA

Original Screenplay: Alex Garland
Achievement in Visual Effects: Andrew Whitehurst, Paul Norris, Mark Ardington and Sara Bennett

45 YEARS:

Actress in a Leading Role: Charlotte Rampling

YOUTH

Achievement in Music Written for Motion Pictures (Original song): Simple Song # 3, music and lyrics by David Lang

AMY

Best Documentary Feature: Asif Kapadia, James Gay-Rees

Film4-backed films receive a record 22 BAFTA nominations

08 Jan, 2016 Productions Posted in: Awards, Bafta

With a total of 22 nominations in this year’s BAFTAs, Film4 films have received more BAFTA nominations than ever before.

carol-1024_LRG (1)

Todd Haynes’ Carol receives nine nominations, joint top of all films nominated in this year’s awards, including nods in the Best Film category as well as for Cate Blanchett for Best Actress and Todd Haynes for Best Director. Rooney Mara also receives a nomination for Best Supporting Actress alongside Phyllis Nagy for Best Adapted Screenplay.

Ex-Machina-Download-Wallpapers

Alex Garland’s Ex_Machina receives five nominations in total. Nominated for Outstanding British Film, Alex Garland is also nominated for Best Original Screenplay and Alicia Vikander for Best Supporting Actress.

Andrew Haigh's 45 Years

Andrew Haigh’s 45 Years

Of the five films nominated in the Outstanding British Film category, four are Film4-backed films: Andrew Haigh’s 45 Years, Asif Kapadia’s Amy (which is also nominated for Best Documentary), Yorgos Lanthimos’ The Lobster and Alex Garland’s Ex_Machina.

The Room--(None)

For Lenny Abrahamson’s Room, Brie Larson is nominated in the Best Actress category (as well as for the Rising Star award) while Emma Donoghue is nominated for Best Adapted Screenplay.

Second Coming Twitter

Debbie Tucker Green is also recognised in the Best Debut Feature category for Second Coming.

David Kosse, Director of Film4, says: “We are delighted that seven of our films have been honoured with a record number of BAFTA nominations this morning. They are a perfect example of the bold, inspirational voices that Film4 is known for backing – each film has been expertly crafted by exceptionally gifted writers, filmmakers and actors. It is enormously gratifying to see our belief in their unique talent recognised by BAFTA and its members in this way. Congratulations to all the filmmakers and all our many partners who helped bring these extraordinarily films into being.”

Film4 BAFTA nominations in full:

Carol
Best Film: Elizabeth Karlsen, Christine Vachon, Stephen Woolley
Director: Todd Haynes
Adapted Screenplay: Phyllis Nagy
Leading Actress: Cate Blanchett
Supporting Actress: Rooney Mara
Cinematography: Ed Lachman
Production Design: Judy Becker, Heather Loeffler
Costume Design: Sandy Powell
Make Up & Hair: Jerry DeCarlo, Patricia Regan

Ex Machina
Outstanding British Film: Alex Garland, Andrew Macdonald, Allon Reich
Outstanding Debut by a British Writer, Director or Producer: Alex Garland (Director)
Original Screenplay: Alex Garland
Supporting Actress: Alicia Vikander
Special Visual Effects: Mark Ardington, Sara Bennett, Paul Norris, Andrew Whitehurst

Room
Adapted Screenplay: Emma Donoghue
Leading Actress: Brie Larson
Rising Star: Brie Larson

Amy
Outstanding British Film: Asif Kapadia, James Gay-Rees
Documentary: Asif Kapadia, James Gay-Rees

45 Years
Outstanding British Film: Andrew Haigh, Tristan Goligher

The Lobster
Outstanding British Film: Yorgos Lanthimos, Ceci Dempsey, Ed Guiney, Lee Magiday, Efthimis Filippou

Second Coming
Outstanding Debut by a British Writer, Director or Producer: Debbie Tucker Green (Writer/Director)

Film4-backed films receive 41 nominations at the BIFAs

03 Nov, 2015 Productions Posted in: Actors and Actresses, Awards, BIFA

Film4 has received a total of 41 nominations for the films it has backed at this year’s British Independent Film Awards (BIFAs), with the nomination lists for the Best British Film and Best Director awards consisting entirely of Film4-backed talent and films.

The Lobster

Yorgos Lanthimos’s The Lobster tops the list with seven nominations. Andrew Haigh’s 45 Years and Justin Kurzel’s Macbeth each receive six nominations while Alex Garland’s Ex Machina and Asif Kapadia’s Amy garnered five nominations each. Sarah Gavron’s Suffragette and Ben Wheatley’s High-Rise have four nominations each.

Macbeth

Macbeth

Film4 films make up the entirety of the nominations for the Best British Independent Film award: 45 Years, Amy, Ex Machina, The Lobster and Macbeth. Similarly, the nominations for Best Director are all for Film4-backed films – Andrew Haigh, Asif Kapadia, Alex Garland, Yorgos Lanthimos and Justin Kurzel. And John Maclean is nominated for Best Debut Director for Slow West alongside Louise Osmond who is nominated in the Best Documentary category for her film Dark Horse: The Incredible True Story of Dream Alliance.

Film4 also dominates the Best Screenplay nominations with 45 Years, Ex­ Machina, High-Rise and The Lobster.

Suffragette

Suffragette

Carey Mulligan is nominated for Best Actress for her role in Suffragette alongside Charlotte Rampling for her role in 45 Years. Tom Courtenay (45 Years), Colin Farrell (The Lobster), Michael Fassbender (Macbeth) and Tom Hiddleston (High-Rise) are all nominated in the Best Actor category.

And last, but not least, in the Best International Independent Film category two of Film4′s most anticipated films are nominated. Lenny Abrahamson’s Room and Todd Haynes’ Carol, both of which are also generating much Academy Awards buzz across the pond.

David Kosse, Director of Film4, says: “I’m thrilled for all our filmmakers who have been nominated for this year’s BIFAs. These awards are vital in highlighting and recognising the work of independent British filmmaking talent and Film4 is immensely proud to have been involved in all of these projects. Good luck to all those nominated.”

The BIFAs are held on 6th December 2015 at Old Billingsgate in central London. 

 

Michael Leader’s 20 LFF 2015 recommendations

Site Editor Michael Leader rounds out our team’s picks for this year’s London Film Festival…

This time last year, I picked a mixture of already-seen and the dying-to-see from the LFF’s 2014 line-up. This time around, I’ve seen far fewer festival favourites – but therein lies the excitement of perusing the LFF’s all-you-can-eat buffet of 2015’s buzziest films. I’ll be gorging on many more come October, but for now here are 20 that I wouldn’t dare miss.

 quays-nolan-01

35mm: The Quays Meet Christopher Nolan

Stephen & Timothy Quay are hugely influential and widely respected in animation circles but, unlike their stop-motion contemporaries (think Jan Švankmajer, Nick Park and Henry Selick), they still sit outside of mainstream appreciation of the artform. These restored prints of their shorts In Absentia, The Comb and Street Of Crocodiles, screening alongside a short, eight-minute documentary about the brothers’ methods directed by Christopher Nolan, will be a sure-fire delight whether or not you’re familiar with the Quays’ distinctive work. [Buy tickets]

Elephant Days

The Maccabees’ behind-the-record film Elephant Days isn’t so much up my street as literally shot down my street, reportedly serving as a documentary portrait of the much maligned Elephant & Castle area of South London, which I’ve called home since 2009. The Elephant’s appeared on screen in the past as a forbidding backdrop for inner-city terror (at best, Attack The Block; at worst, Harry Brown); a more personal take on the neighbourhood is long overdue. [Buy tickets]

elstree-1976-01

Elstree 1976

I love Star Wars, but not as much as I love documentaries about people who haven’t so much had a brush with fame, as stood in proximity to it (such as music docs Anvil and Mistaken For Strangers). Jon Spira’s film combines the two to introduce us to ten performers who played bit parts in George Lucas’s blockbusting sci-fi adventure, which should offer a much-needed respite from the relentless hype-train for Episode VII. [Buy tickets]

Hitchcock/Truffaut

Francois Truffaut’s landmark series of candid interviews with Alfred Hitchcock, published as Le Cinéma selon Alfred Hitchcock in 1967 (afterwards translated into English as Hitchcock/Truffaut), is one of my go-to film books, and it sounds like Kent Jones’ documentary – which features filmmakers including Wes Anderson, Richard Linklater, David Fincher and Martin Scorsese – serves as both a fitting companion to the book, and an effective illustration of Hitchcock’s enduring influence. [Buy tickets]

I Am Belfast

No doubt one for fans of Chris Petit, Andrew Kotting and Patrick Keiller, the latest from Story Of Film director/critic Mark Cousins is a ‘metaphorical essay’ about his hometown, which recasts Belfast as a 10,000 year old lady with a rich and complex history, complete with archive footage, a soundtrack by composer David Holmes (Hunger, ‘71), and cinematography from Christopher Doyle (In The Mood For Love, Hero). [Buy tickets]

In Jackson Heights

After last year’s National Gallery, seasoned documentarian Frederick Wiseman returns with a look at one of New York’s most diverse neighbourhoods, observing the everyday life of a population that speaks 167 languages. Wiseman’s patient filmmaking style isn’t for everyone – his films are rarely under three hours long, and In Jackson Heights is no exception – but the texture and detail found in his work are second to none. [Buy tickets]

The Invitation

I’m expecting to spend most of my time at the LFF gleefully devouring the dark genre delights in the Cult selection (check out the full line-up here), but I’m most excited to see The Invitation, directed by Karyn Kusama (Jennifer’s Body) – a slowburn chamber piece that wrests tension, paranoia and anxiety out of the most simple of social engagements: the dinner party. [Buy tickets]

Janis, Little Girl Blue

Every year, the LFF’s Sonic strand delivers a strong selection of music documentaries, and 2015’s line-up is no different, judging by the inclusion of Danny Says, a portrait of Ramones manager and ‘pop culture Zelig’ Danny Fields; Sacha Jenkins’ hip-hop fashion doc Fresh Dressed and, most notably, this comprehensive look at the life and music of Janis Joplin, directed by Oscar nominee Amy Berg (West Of Memphis). [Buy tickets]

Listen To Me Marlon

Continuing the trend set by the likes of Amy and Cobain: Montage Of Heck, this bio-doc from director Stevan Riley (Fire In Babylon, Everything Or Nothing: The Untold Story Of 007) sets its sights on another inscrutable icon, the legendary Marlon Brando, offering an intimate portrait through the actor’s personal archive of audio recordings, encompassing everything from press interviews and business meetings to hypnosis and therapy sessions. [Buy tickets]

The Lobster

Yorgos Lanthimos’ deft, deliciously twisted, yet ultimately moving satire on the culture of coupledom bagged the Jury Prize at Cannes in May, and finally makes it way to the UK as the LFF’s Dare Gala. This deadpan, dystopian drama, featuring a stellar cast including Colin Farrell, Rachel Weisz and Olivia Colman, is like no other film in the selection: an oddball treat for romantics with a perverse sense of humour. [Buy tickets]

office-01

Office

Johnnie To, the king of stylish Hong Kong cinema, gathers an all-star cast (headed by Chow Yun Fat) for this lavish adaptation of co-writer and cast member Sylvia Chang’s play Design For Living. Whether they are gangster movies (Drug War), romantic thrillers (Blind Detective) or, in this case, white-collar workplace musicals, To’s films always dazzle with eye-popping costumes and production design that beg to be seen on the big screen. [Buy tickets]

Our Little Sister

I’m a fully paid-up member of the Hirokazu Kore-eda fan club (interviewing the man himself at the LFF two years ago was a festival highlight), so I’m already on board with this adaptation of a manga series about three sisters taking in a younger half-sister after their father dies. Expect the gentlest of gentle dramas, light on incident yet full of heart. [Buy tickets]

park-lanes-02

Park Lanes

Part of the fun of festivals is seeing films you almost certainly won’t find elsewhere. This year’s “Least likely to show up in your local Cineworld” prize goes to Kevin Jerome Everson’s Park Lanes, an eight hour long recreation (take that, Wiseman) of one day in the life of a factory that manufactures bowling alley equipment, which promises to offer an epic, intimate insight into the drudgery and social interactions at the heart of the American workplace. [Buy tickets]

public-house-01

Public House

Another South London story, Sarah Turner’s documentary reportedly bends genre conventions to tell the tale of the Ivy House in Nunhead, which was earmarked for redevelopment until the locals rallied around this pillar of the community, eventually turning it into ‘London’s first co-operatively-owned pub’. [Buy tickets]

Queen Of Earth

Frankly, I haven’t yet come to terms with the end of Mad Men. The only consolation is seeing Elisabeth Moss flourish on the big screen (see 2014’s sci-fi-tinged relationship drama The One I Love). This psychological drama, her second collaboration with writer-director Alex Ross Perry (Listen Up Philip), opened recently in the States and was greeted with uniformly positive reviews, praising in particular Moss’s performance as a woman on the verge of an emotional breakdown after a series of life-changing events. [Buy tickets]

The Room--(None)

Room

I’m intrigued to see how Emma Donoghue’s award-winning novel, told from the juvenile perspective of a boy brought up in captivity, will translate from page to screen, but what a dream team to handle the transition: director Lenny Abrahamson (Frank, What Richard Did), Donoghue herself writing the screenplay, and Brie Larson in the lead role of a young woman striving to create a semblance of family life in the midst of a Fritzl-like confinement. [Buy tickets]

carol-1024_LRG (1)

Todd Haynes: Screen Talk

It’s hard to believe that Todd Haynes has only directed six feature films in his near 30-year career, most recently ending an eight-year break from the big screen with the instant-classic Carol. It will be a rare pleasure to hear him look back his small, perfectly-formed body of work, as well as his award-winning shorts and television work, in the LFF’s ever-fascinating Screen Talk strand. [Buy tickets]

When Marnie Was There

Studio Ghibli alert! The legendary Japanese animation house’s first appearance in the LFF line-up since The Cat Returns in 2003 comes with a bittersweet aftertaste, since this gentle gem from Arrietty director Hiromasa Yonebayashi is, for now, Ghibli’s final release – so treasure it while you still can. [Buy tickets]

The Witch

Robert Eggers’ Sundance prize-winning Puritan-era horror became a must-see for me after David Ehrlich, in his fevered Time Out rave, called it “A jaw-droppingly bold gift from God… A major horror event on par with recent festival sensations like Kill List and The Babadook”. A creepy-as-hell trailer, released last month, cemented the deal. [Buy tickets]

Yakuza Apocalypse

I could easily pick out any of the LFF Cult strand’s Japanese Contingent (boasting new films from directors Hideo Nakata and Sion Sono) but I’ll plump for the latest from professionally-prolific powerhouse Takashi Miike: a vampire/mobster mash-up that’s sure to fit comfortably alongside his craziest work. [Buy tickets]