We round up our favourite reviews of Andrea Arnold’s American Honey coming out of Cannes 2016

American Honey screened yesterday for press at Cannes for the very first time. We’ve already taken a look at the best instant responses on Twitter. Now that the critics have had time to write up their reviews, here are a selection of some of our favourites…

 

Guy Lodge for Variety says:

“Part dreamy millennial picaresque, part distorted tapestry of Americana and part exquisitely illustrated iTunes musical, “Honey” daringly commits only to the loosest of narratives across its luxurious 162-minute running time. Yet it’s constantly, engrossingly active, spinning and sparking and exploding in cycles like a Fourth of July Catherine wheel”

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Finn Halligan for Screen Daily says:

American Honey is a vivid polaroid of a point in time, that reckless bridge between stepping out into adult life and fully entering it, a point during which you’re never more alive. Following a quasi-renegade group of poor white kids as they bus around the American heartland selling magazine subscriptions to the gullible, it pulsates with energy, and not just from its rousing soundtrack.”

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 Ryland Aldrich for TwitchFilm says:

Only a few times in a generation does a film speak to youth in a lasting and powerful way. Films like Rebel Without A Cause, Easy Rider, and Kids all tapped into their respective contemporary consciousnesses with the effect of not just capturing the era for preservation, ut also influencing the very generation of portrayal. With astonishing performances, remarkable use of music, and truly deft filmmaking, Andrea Arnold’s American Honey has every potential to be that film for this generation.

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Eric Kohn for Indiewire says:

“With only four movies in 10 years, director Andrea Arnold has developed a rich filmography that other filmmakers spend decades trying to accumulate. [...] While her Wuthering Heights adaptation tried to take her technique to a grander scale, American Honey completes the effort with its sprawling portrait of young outcasts. It’s the closest thing to a magnum opus in Arnold’s blossoming career.”

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Donald Clarke for the Irish Times says:

“What really makes the film sing is its gorgeous, original texture. Our own Robbie Ryan, shooting in Arnold’s preferred narrow Academy ratio, offers dynamic, glowing images that capture each destination with startling concision. Joe Bini, a regular collaborator with Werner Herzog, brings zipped-up energy to the editing. Any five-minute stretch could be extracted to form a worthwhile short film.”

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We’ll be adding more reviews as they come in, so watch this space!